Friday, May 02, 2014

Michhami Dukkadam


 Micchami Dukkadam means asking for forgiveness for hurting in the past, knowingly or unknowingly. It is also an unconditional owning up to the human nature to err, and ask for forgiveness if one may inadvertently end up hurting in the future.

This idea of Jainism appeals a lot, it is one of the most noble, sweet little ideals that a religion could inculcate in its followers.

Just like flowers hold no grudge against the child that uproots plants in an impulsive fit, may God also give me the strength to forgive those who have wronged me. It is a very tough call. Anger, hate and envy are more persistent than calm, love and appreciation. Everyday, each disappointment brings with it the potential to push up to either set of emotions. I want the strength and blessings to accept the latter set, the positive.

For all my anger and my bluntness, for the times I act selfish...
 
Khamemi Savve Jiva

Savve Jiva Khamantu me

Mitti me Savva Bhooesu

Veram Majjham Na Kenvi

Michchhami Dukkadam

I forgive all living beings.
May all souls forgive me,
I am on friendly terms with all;
I have no animosity toward any soul.
May all my faults be dissolved.


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Meow Handicrafts - Updates

We took up a stall at Goa's happening Saturday Night Market in December. The experience was amazing, encouraging, learning, at times a little too exhausting, but on the whole quite worth it.

For those who have come late to the party, Meow Handicrafts is my venture to sell paper and bead jewellery and a lot of other interesting stuff that I make. It's named after my cat, Meow. We are working  to update our collection on Etsy. A whole new range should be up soon, watch this space for news.

Here are some photos of work in progress :



     Modern Meditation / Meow Handicrafts (C) Gauri Gharpure



     Meow on my mind 

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

A dog's life

Last night, Lali, our dog of twelve years, died.

She was playing till the last. Indiraben had just let her go out of the house for her night stroll, and about half an hour later, when she went to fetch Lali back, Indiraben found her lying motionless in the middle of the road outside our house.

First we thought a speeding vehicle had knocked her down. We checked her body, but she had no signs of injury whatever. She was still warm, and we thought she moved her ears and eyes. But she was definitely dead; Indiraben and I were only resorting to last-ditch death-defying hope. As I lifted Lali up to remove her to a safer place, her tongue spilled out. It was bluish-grey, pretty much off colour. We concluded a snake bite. A small consolation is that Lali died near us and that we had time to mourn her, to arrange a proper burial. 

Sheeba, her sibling was all confused this morning as they took Lali away. We thought Sheebu would go first, what with her numerous health problems. When Sheebu was recuperating from a surgery some months back, Lali surprised us by pushing in bits of bread for Sheebu through the iron gate every evening. It was as if she also wanted her share of nursing Sheebu back to health. 

Lali's death was sudden as sudden death is. 

In spite of having to digest that dreadful news many times, every time someone dies, the swiftness and the aloofness of the process never fails to amaze me. It makes me feel infinitesimally smaller and helpless. Some people might be put off by likening human death with animal death - I agree both have huge differences - but there are also similarities. When you hold in your hands a dead bird, or a squirrel, a puppy or a dog, the helplessness and strange spiritual anger and disbelief is similar to the devastation and rage on losing a human. 

Lali enriched our life with her constant, unconditional presence quite like a good friend or a loving relative. It was definitely not a dog's life.



Lali (L) and Sheeba in December 2009

Sunday, October 13, 2013

Navratra 2013

Was home for the festival after a long time.

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Coexistence

Restlessness.

There's a certain amount of restlessness brewing up. An uneasy feeling takes over when you feel something big is going to happen, or that it's about time things change and something big happens, or rather that things don't change at all and instead tread back into time and freeze exactly at those moments you decide.

Calm.

There's also a certain calm. Strange, that it can coexist with restlessness. But there is a realization that whether things change or not, for good or better, the status quo is quite pleasant and that life at this point is such that many may envy.

Every year, there is a certain month and a certain date that creeps up suddenly from behind you and demands a ledger of your life till then. It is on days preceding such dates that you get into a solemn state of mind, curb your jokes and randomness, those  smiles, and everything else that you do to hide your old hurt and wounded self from the world. Most of the times these remedies work.

And when they don't, you snuggle up to your father, or your cat, or imagine a love that could be. Even as you imagine, you remeber to thank God that everything is just the way it is, not an inch better, not an inch worse.

It is the present that is the most mysterious and the most giving; a strange mix of calm and restlessness and I wouldn't want it any other way.

GG

Monday, July 01, 2013

Why 30 is not the new 20

http://youtu.be/vhhgI4tSMwc


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Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Wine

You didn't come into this house so I might tear off
a piece of your life. Perhaps when you leave
you'll take something of mine: chestnuts, roses or
a surety of roots or boats
that I wanted to share with you, comrade.

From Neruda's poem 'Wine'


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